Wild Border Watersheds

American Indian, Alaska Native organizations back transboundary protections (Juneau Empire)

The National Congress of American Indians, the Alaska Federation of Natives, the Alaska Native Brotherhood and the Alaska Native Sisterhood have added their voices to those calling for protections of salmon and eulachon rivers that flow from British Columbia and into Alaska.

Southeast Alaskan fishermen, tourism operators and environmental groups, as well as some municipalities and Native organizations like the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, have been vocal in their concern about British Columbia’s mining development plans, forming the United Tribal Transboundary Mining Working Group, traveling to D.C. to meet with Alaska’s Congressional delegation and environmental regulators, and holding many meetings sharing their concerns.

“The health of our rivers and streams is paramount for Alaska Natives and American Indians, especially those who rely on our traditional and customary ways of life. Since rivers do not recognize the arbitrary boundaries drawn on maps, it is the responsibility of the United States and Canada to work together on maintaining a healthy ecosystem and clean water for the protection of all of our subsistence resources,” said Jacqueline Johnson Pata, executive director of NCAI, in a press release.

(To read complete source article, click "Juneau Empire")

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